CANAPI works diligently to stop the spread of HIV through identification of infections, educational resources, referrals and community advocacy.

Jump to: Hours/Appointments, testing timeline, risk factors, what to expect, PrEP/PEP Info, PrEP Payment Assistance, U=U, Advocacy & Referrals, HIV/STD Hotline, HIV FAQs


HIV Screening

Hours & Appointments

We have walk-in screening hours every Thursday evening from 5pm-8pm.
We also have screening available by appointment Monday - Thursday.

Not sure if you need an HIV test? This quick online survey tells you if CANAPI would recommend a test, based on your risk factors. Important note: your survey results do NOT mean that you do not have HIV. The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested.

Contact us:
phone: 330-252-1559
email: info@canapi.org 

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Before you test, ask yourself these questions

1. When was my last potential exposure?

If your last exposure was within the last month, a rapid test may not yet display an accurate result. In that case, you can wait until a rapid test is appropriate, or you can contact your primary care doctor for more options.

Go to your local emergency room or health care provider and ask for PEP - see more information on PEP below.

Go to your local emergency room or health care provider and ask for PEP - see more information on PEP below.

If your most recent exposure was in the last 24-72 hours, and you have reason to believe you were exposed to HIV, 🛑 STOP! 🛑 Go to your local emergency room or health care provider and ask for PEP: Post-Exposure Prophylaxis, a drug which prevents HIV exposure.

2. When was the last time I was tested?

If you have already been tested within the last month, and you were not advised to come in for a retest, then there is no need to test for HIV at this time. 

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3. What are my risk factors?

HIV risk factors for you and your partner(s) can include:

⏺ Unprotected anal or vaginal sex
⏺ Several or anonymous sexual partners
⏺ Injection drug use
⏺ Recent herpes or syphilis diagnosis
⏺ Trading sex for money, drugs, or something else

Remember, HIV only spreads through contact with infected semen, vaginal fluid, rectal fluid, blood, or breast milk. Since HIV cannot live on surfaces, contact must be within the body or mucus membranes for transmission to occur. HIV rarely spreads through oral sex, unless there are sores or broken skin in the mouth and/or on the genitals/anus.

If none of these are risk factors, there is no need to test for HIV at this time. 

Use this online survey to determine whether CANAPI would recommend an HIV test, based on your risk factors. Important note: your online survey results do NOT mean that you do not have HIV. The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested.

 

What to Expect: Screening and Risk Reduction Counseling

CANAPI provides free HIV screening, counseling, and referral services.

Here is the process:

  1. Schedule an appointment or come for walk-in hours.

  2. Fill out a questionnaire to determine your risk of HIV

  3. If you and the HIV screening counselor decide it’s appropriate, they will conduct an HIV test. During your test, your screening counselor will talk with you about how to reduce your risk of HIV.

TYPES OF hiv TESTS at canapi:

Generation 3 HIV-1/HIV-2 finger stick HIV Test (Oraquick). The test takes 20 minutes to produce a result. If the test shows a positive result, we will collect a second finger stick sample using the Insti HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Antibody test. This verification test is definitive, and takes 60 seconds to produce a result. If the verification test is positive, we will immediately begin the linkage to care process.

Generation 3 HIV-1/HIV-2 finger stick HIV Test (Oraquick). The test takes 20 minutes to produce a result. If the test shows a positive result, we will collect a second finger stick sample using the Insti HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Antibody test. This verification test is definitive, and takes 60 seconds to produce a result. If the verification test is positive, we will immediately begin the linkage to care process.

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To see how the Oraquick Test is done, click here

(Make sure to watch the finger stick portion - the state of Ohio no longer offers oral swab testing).

To see how the Insti is done, click here


CANAPI staff may also use the Alere Determine Generation 4 finger stick test. The test will take 20 minutes to produce a result. If the test shows a positive result, we will refer you for a blood test from the local health department or a primary care physician for a confirmatory lab sample.

CANAPI staff may also use the Alere Determine Generation 4 finger stick test. The test will take 20 minutes to produce a result. If the test shows a positive result, we will refer you for a blood test from the local health department or a primary care physician for a confirmatory lab sample.

To see how the Alere determine is done, click here

 

For FAQ's, click here.


PrEP Works!

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What is PrEP?

PrEP is short for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis.

PRE = BEFORE
EXPOSURE = COMING INTO CONTACT WITH HIV
PROPHYLAXIS = TREATMENT TO PREVENT AN

PrEP is a medication which helps people avoid contracting HIV.

Studies have shown that when taken as prescribed, PrEP is between 92-100% effective in preventing HIV. PrEP is even more effective when combined with other prevention strategies, such as condoms. 

Currently, the only FDA-approved medication for PrEP is Truvada®.

Where can I get PrEP?

PrEP is available by prescription from doctors, nurse practitioners, and/or physician's assistants. 

Here is a list of providers in Ohio.

To obtain PrEP, you must first test negative for HIV. You must also have regular lab tests to monitor your HIV status and overall health.

Does insurance cover it?
Most private health insurance and Medicaid plans cover PrEP. To find out, contact your insurance provider. 


PrEP Payment Assistance

Like many medications, PrEP can be expensive. Thankfully, there are assistance programs to help.

PAPI (Prevention Assistance Program Interventions) is an Ohio program which helps cover PrEP-related costs, such as doctor’s visits, blood tests, and medical services for those who are ineligible for insurance.

Learn more about PAPI or apply for enrollment.

GILEAD ADVANCING ACCESS

If you need assistance with PrEP prescription co-pays, and you're uninsured, you may qualify for Gilead’s Advancing Access program. The program may also apply to people on Medicare who don’t have Part D prescription drug coverage.

To determine if you are eligible, your medical provider needs to submit an application for you. For more information call (855) 330-5479.

For more info, visit Gilead's website here.

PrEP Co-Pay Coupon Cards

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If you have insurance and need help with copay and deductible costs, Gilead’s Advancing Access Co-Pay Coupon covers up to $4,800 per year, with no monthly limit, of out-of-pocket expenses for PrEP, including copays, coinsurance, and deductibles. There is no income requirement, however it is not available for those on Medicaid, Medicare Part D or any other government prescription drug programs. The coupons are available at CANAPI.

Patient Advocate foundation

For people who get PrEP coverage via insurance or Medicare, the Patient Advocate Foundation provides up to $7,500 per year to help pay for PrEP-related costs. Eligibility is based on income. If you earn less than 400 percent of the federal poverty level (about $48,560 for an individual with no dependents) you may qualify. For more information call (866) 512-3861 and select option 1.

PEP

What is PEP?

Post-exposure prophylaxis, or PEP, is a way to prevent HIV infection after a recent possible exposure to the virus. 

PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after a recent possible exposure to HIV. If you think you’ve recently been exposed to HIV during sex, through sharing needles, or if you’ve been sexually assaulted, talk to your health care provider or an emergency room doctor about PEP right away.


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What is "Undetectable" or "U=U" 

"U=U" stands for Undetectable=Untransmittable.

Since HIV treatment medications came out, they have significantly improved. Today, HIV medications can reduce someone’s amount of the HIV virus (viral load) enough that it’s undetectable on an HIV test.

Once HIV is undetectable, it is also untransmittable. Someone with an undetectable viral load cannot transmit HIV to another person. To remain undetectable, people living with HIV must adhere to their treatment plan.

Read more about this breakthrough here


Advocacy & Referrals

CANAPI is proud to offer informational resources about LGBTQ communities and HIV. And we are grateful for the ability to direct our clients to one of our many excellent community partner organizations, when necessary.

CANAPI provides HIV education to organizations, schools and community groups We have speakers available to lecture on topics including prevention and risk reduction, living with HIV, current trends in the epidemic and its treatment, as well as information about our agency and its services.

CANAPI stocks a variety of printed materials about HIV/AIDS, some of which are geared toward specific populations such as teens, racial and sexual minorities, and health and safety workers. CANAPI distributes safer sex supplies throughout the community. Safer sex supplies and informational literature are also available at our office, free of charge.

We also provide referrals to clients in need of specialized medical care, legal guidance, support groups, and other services. Please contact us at 330.252.1559 if you would like to learn more.


Ohio HIV/STD Prevention Hotline

Call 1.800.332.2437 for free, anonymous, and confidential HIV/STD info.

You can also email the Ohio HIV/STD Hotline. The Hotline is staffed by trained volunteers and AIDS Resource Center Ohio Prevention and Education staff. It operates Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Find more here.


HIV/AIDS FAQs

If you have more questions, feel free to email info@canapi.org.

What is HIV?
HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is the virus that causes AIDS. HIV attacks the immune system, making it difficult for your body to fight off infection.

What is AIDS?
AIDS stands for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Acquired means you get infected with it. Immune Deficiency means a weakness in the body’s immune system to fight diseases. Syndrome means a group of health problems that make up a disease.

Is there a cure for HIV/AIDS? 
No. There is not a cure for HIV/AIDS. Currently, we cannot entirely remove HIV from the body. However, HIV/AIDS is highly treatable.

Are there treatments available for people infected with HIV/AIDS? 
Yes. HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy) is available for all people infected with HIV/AIDS.

How long is the lifespan of an individual infected with HIV/AIDS?
With proper medical care, diet, exercise and adherence to HAART, an individual infected with HIV/AIDS can expect to live a full lifetime.

How might I become infected with HIV? 
Certain types of exposure to infected bodily fluids can lead to infection. Blood, semen, vaginal fluid, rectal fluid, and breast milk can contain infectious levels of HIV. A person can contract HIV after having unprotected anal or vaginal with an infected person. Most commonly, HIV is sexually transmitted via unprotected receptive anal sex. Sharing needles and other drug injection equipment is another common mode of HIV transmission.

Who is at risk of HIV?

Anyone can be infected with HIV. However, certain behaviors make some people more likely to contract HIV. These include unprotected anal or vaginal sex, injection drug use, and sex.

People from certain communities also have a higher likelihood of contracting HIV. Some communities have higher rates of new HIV infections, which makes it more likely that someone within that community will get infected.

In Ohio, those who are at highest risk of HIV exposure are gay and bisexual men - particularly young black gay and bisexual men, people who inject drugs, trans people - particularly black trans women, partners of people living with HIV, partners of people who inject drugs, partners of gay or bisexual men, people who were diagnosed with syphilis within the past year, and people who moved from the south and haven’t been tested recently.

How can I reduce my risk of infection?  
Use a condom every time you have anal or vaginal sex. If you are an injection drug user, do not share your needles. Use bleach and water to clean your needles after each use. Needle exchange programs are available in certain areas, including the City of Akron.

What are the symptoms of HIV infection? 
Some people experience early HIV symptoms, others do not. Symptoms can include flu-like symptoms: fever, rash, muscle aches and swollen lymph nodes and glands.

The only way to know for certain that you are infected with HIV is to be tested.

Where can I get screened for HIV? 
CANAPI offers free and confidential HIV screening by appointment Monday - Thursday, and walk-in screening from 5-8pm on Thursdays. Screening is also available at all public health departments. To make an appointment at CANAPI, call 330-252-1559 to schedule an appointment with CANAPI. Otherwise, you can call your local health department to schedule an appointment or call 1-800-332-2437 to find the screening site nearest to you.

How is one tested for HIV? 
There are many different HIV tests available.

In a healthcare setting (doctor's office):
A vial of blood is drawn by a health care professional and sent to a lab for testing. This method can take up to one week to deliver results.

In a non-healthcare setting (such as CANAPI):
Rapid testing is available. Your finger will be pricked to collect and test a small blood sample. This process takes about 20 minutes.

How often should I be screened for HIV and other STDs? 
This depends on your level of risk. If you engage in risky sexual or drug use behaviors, we recommend getting screened every 3-6 months. If you are in a monogamous relationship with someone who is HIV negative, you may not need to get screened unless your circumstances change.

CANAPI offers HIV screenings. For all STD screenings, call your local health department to schedule an appointment.

If your test is negative – 
A negative or non-reactive results indicates that antibodies to HIV are not present in your body at that time. However, antibodies to HIV can take up to three months to develop. If you think you have been exposed, it is best to wait three months to be tested. Testing prior to three months may result in a false negative.

If your test is positive – 
A positive or reactive test result indicates that antibodies to HIV are present in your body. A follow-up test is needed to verify these results.

How accurate are the tests? 
CANAPI uses Oraquick Rapid Antibody HIV 1/2 and Alere Determine Ag/Ab Rapid testing devices. These testing devices are 99.8% accurate and 100% sensitive. 100% sensitive means that if your test results are negative then, at that time, you are free of HIV.

What is the difference between anonymous and confidential HIV testing? 
If you are tested anonymously for HIV then you are known only as a number, and you will not receive a copy of your test results. If you test confidentially, you provide your name and other information. A copy of your results is given to you if you test confidentially. All information collected remains confidential and is only sent to health agencies to help them keep track of HIV statistical info.